Off-Target Effects Analysis

Whenever the genome is modified, off-target effects can be a concern. If they are a concern for your research, we are offering JAX Off-Target Analysis Services to support your needs.

Our service includes amplifying via PCR the genomic region around potential off target sites and sequencing them to look for off-target events.

  • You will receive a report summarizing the indel frequency of the potential off-target sites.
  • Delivery time is 3 weeks.

About Off-Target Effects

Guides used in our CRISPR/Cas9 strategy are chosen to optimize efficiency while minimizing off-target effects. If the off-target effects are of concern for a particular project, we can address the concern by performing off-target analysis.

At The Jackson Laboratory, we use bioinformatics approaches to minimize off-target activity by searching the genome for regions of similar sequence identity to the sgRNAs. In the rare chance that an off-target event has occurred, our process of breeding founder mice to the N1 stage allows for the segregation of the off-target event from the properly targeted allele. In general, if CRISPR approaches are well-designed, off-target effects can be significantly minimized. Based on our experience with loci for which we’ve investigated off target events, the genome editing method has been quite precise in targeting only specific DNA sequences of interest.

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Breeding Services


Our breeding and integrated services save you time, space, and money. JAX simplifies your mouse colony management by shipping mice to you as needed.

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Cre Repository

The JAX Cre Repository's aim is to provide the scientific community with a centralized, comprehensive set of well-characterized Cre Driver lines and related information resources.

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JAX CRISPR Featured in Recent GEN Article

"More Tooth, More Tail in CRISPR Operations: The Most Interesting Thing about CRISPR/Cas9 Is What It Can Accomplish in the Hands of Gifted Researchers"

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