Breast Cancer Genetic Testing

Do you know which genetic test for breast cancer to order? Test your knowledge in Kayla's case and see the free CME courses and resources below for more information!

Test your knowledge

Kayla Cancer DiagramKayla is 32 years of age and was just diagnosed with breast cancer. Her mother had breast cancer at age 45, and her maternal aunt had breast cancer at age 30. Her maternal grandmother died of ovarian cancer at 54.

You determine that Kayla is at high risk for breast and ovarian cancer, and she is interested in genetic testing.

What is the best genetic testing option for Kayla?

  1. Comprehensive analysis of the BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes
  2. A panel of genes associated with a high risk for hereditary breast cancer
  3. A panel of genes associated with moderately-increased breast cancer risk
  4. No testing

See the answer

The correct answer is 2) A panel of genes associated with a high risk for hereditary breast cancer.

Kayla is at high risk for breast and ovarian cancer and should at least be offered testing of the BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes. Kayla is at high risk for breast and ovarian cancer and should at least be offered testing of the BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes. About 15-20% of hereditary breast and ovarian cancers are associated with genes other than BRCA1 and BRCA2. Other genes are a strong possibility when a family has a striking feature, such as the very early age at diagnosis seen in Kayla and her aunt.

See more cases and access the free Genetic Testing for Breast Cancer CME course >>

Learn more about BRCA1 and BRCA2 >> 

Learn more about how to recognize genetic syndromes in families >>

Learn more

About one in 10 women has a family history of breast and/or ovarian cancer that puts her at increased risk of developing these malignancies due to underlying genetic factors. These courses provide opportunities to learn about hereditary breast cancer syndromes, how to use family history to assess risk level, genetic testing, using genetic information to inform management, and communicating with patients about genetic risk.

Genetic testing for breast cancer risk Self-directed, 15-minute online program about evaluating how well a particular genetic test assesses breast cancer risk (clinical validity) and the potential impact of testing on patient outcomes (clinical utility).  (free CME available)

Collecting family history Self-directed, 15-minute online program about asking the right questions to elicit enough information to assess family history disease risk. (free CME available)

Identifying red flags and patterns that increase risk Self-directed, 15-minute online program about Identifying genetic red flags and patterns in a family medical history that can help determine if a condition has a significant genetic contribution. (free CME available)

Categorizing cancer risk Self-directed, 15-minute online program that provides opportunity to learn and practice how to analyze family histories and classify the patients' risk into average, increased (or moderate), or high risk for cancer. (free CME available)

Using family history to inform management Self-directed, 15-minute online program about determining appropriate management based on family history risk using available guidelines. (free CME available)

Pre-test decisions & counseling Self-directed, 15-minute online program about deciding when and if genetic testing is appropriate, given the clinical and personal context. (free CME available)

Interpreting genetic testing results Self-directed, 15-minute online program about interpreting genetic testing results within a patient’s specific context. (free CME available)

Genetic testing technology Self-directed, 15-minute online program about weighing the benefits, risks, and limitations of different tests within specific patient contexts. (free CME available)

See more breast cancer resources >>

 

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